Category Archives: art

Fair Film Choosing For Couples™ – 10 rules will lead to a lifetime of happy evenings, or your money back – Bread and Watir

I’m a huge fan of gamification. I’m also a huge fan of fairness. So when an opportunity arises to combine the two, I find myself unable to resist. Me and my better half are both self confessed cinephiles and love nothing more than finishing up a hard day with a bottle of wine and a film. Sadly, on occasion the overlap in the Venn diagram of our preferred genre is smaller than we’d like, and we can find ourselves at loggerheads as to what to watch. We will critique each others choices until one of two things happen; 1) We realise it’s nearly midnight and we go to bed having not watched a film, or 2) One of us will relent and watch the other’s film while moaning about the “total lack of credible storyline” or sniping “you don’t really believe you can take out a chopper with a police car do you?”. And that’s what led to the invention of FFCFC.

I guarantee these 10 simple rules will lead to a lifetime of happy evenings or your money back:

Continues at Bread and Watir – software testing and bakery.

Zero Dark Thirty – A Review

Skinny, petite girl lives empty, violent, narrowly moral life on behalf of her state pivoting around her (eventually zealous) drive to capture a very bad man and thereby validate herself.

It happens.

Then she realises the “empty” bit, and that the future will possibly be filled with nightmares of torture rather than Sex and the City reruns.

Although that would be about the same.

And just in case you missed it:

U.S. Senator John McCain, who was tortured during his time as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam, said upon watching the film that it left him sick — “because it’s wrong.” In a speech in the Senate, he said, “Not only did the use of enhanced interrogation techniques on Khalid Sheikh Mohammed not provide us with key leads on bin Laden’s courier, Abu Ahmed, it actually produced false and misleading information.”[58] McCain and fellow senators Dianne Feinstein and Carl Levin sent a critical letter to Michael Lynton, chairman of the film’s distributor, Sony Pictures Entertainment, stating, “[W]ith the release of Zero Dark Thirty, the filmmakers and your production studio are perpetuating the myth that torture is effective. You have a social and moral obligation to get the facts right.”[59]

The Entire Run Of Omni Magazine Is Available Online For Free # One for the SciFi Geeks

HT @geoffarnold:

Focusing on both science and science fiction, Omni enjoyed a long and venerable run, first published in October 1978. The print version lasted until Winter 1995, and while a digital version continued through 1997, eventually that, too, folded. That’s a damn shame, but what an amazingly cool treat that the entire run of the magazine is available for our perusal at the Internet Archive. Some days I really love the internet.

During its long history, Omni featured many who would go on to become notable contributors to science fiction literature, including Ben Bova, who worked as an editor for the mag. Omni also first published many stories that became genre classics, such as Harlan Ellison’s novella, Mephisto in Onyx and William Gibson’s Burning Chrome. It also published genre-leaning stories by more mainstream writers, including William S. Burroughs and Joyce Carol Oates.

via The Entire Run Of Omni Magazine Is Available Online For Free | Giant Freakin Robot.

This is the most sexually explicit thing I’ve ever posted on this blog, and yet …

This is the most sexually explicit thing I’ve ever posted on this blog, and yet…

  • it’s on YouTube and unrated, so it can’t be that bad
  • there’s no nudity
  • there’s no swearing
  • there’s no blasphemy
  • it’s artistically lit and framed
  • and there’s only one person
  • for a few minutes
  • reading aloud from a reasonably serious, if slightly left-field, book of poetry

Of course that’s not all that’s going on – but that’s another matter, and it’s as opaque and discreet as can be managed in the circumstances.

So: me being me, the most important question raised by this popular YouTube video (1.3 million hits) is whether it represents the kind of adult content that needs to be kept away from our eyes by default, so that we would have to opt-in to see it?

Let alone that such filtering, if imposed, would be rather haphazard and lead to hampering completely unrelated business.

There was a (in some ways) similar film last year, which was rated UK-15; and R in the States.

I don’t feel corrupted or depraved by this. Do you?