Category Archives: living

New Marmite ad is magnificent, especially the pixellated dog

Shame about the stupidity.

One Voice Community Choir perform on a closed M6 Motorway

So yesterday I was returning from Scotland – more of that later – and traffic alerts and GPS guided me around a major motorway closure; the M6 near Stoke-on-Trent was closed due to a fatal motorcycle crash, traffic was stopped in the road for several hours whilst investigations were carried out – I believe the crash was towards 9am and the motorway was still closed well after lunch – and there were many, many motorists stuck in 27C+ temperatures on a hot road.

Another friend of mine was not so lucky – her choir was stuck in the midst of it – so they organised an impromptu concert on the motorway verge:

11 Harsh Realities About The World Of Harry Potter

Glad I’m not the only person who’s thought this:

11 Harsh Realities About The World Of Harry PotterWe’re blowing the lid off this totalitarian regime! Once you peel back the layers of child-like wonder, it kind of sucks to be a wizard.

via 11 Harsh Realities About The World Of Harry Potter.

…aaaaaand I’m back.

Been a bit quiet here, recently.  Back now.  Normal-ish service to be resumed over the next few weeks.

 

What the Web used to look like: Back when I wrote/ran search engines for Sun

Kiwi (FTP archive search to Sun internally) and Ben-Nevis (AltaVista ripoff) – two of Sun’s first-ever search engines, internally facing, lashed up in Perl and with (eventually) CGI interfaces; the graphics are from a public presentation on “What the Web Does” that I did, sometime around (I think?) 1995.

Scan

America’s Raisin Regime: De minimis curat lex # Gosplan’s Sour Grapes in the USA

Repeat after me: state regulation is always a sane and desirable thing…

WHETHER the obscure statute that governs America’s raisin trade is constitutional, Elena Kagan is not sure. She and her fellow Supreme Court justices are pondering that question at the moment, and will rule shortly. But she sounds reasonably confident that the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937 is “the world’s most outdated law”.

Since the 1940s raisin farmers have been obliged to make over a portion of their crop to a government agency called the Raisin Administrative Committee. The committee, run by 47 raisin farmers and packers, along with a sole member of the raisin-eating public, decides each year how many raisins the domestic market can bear, and thus how many it should siphon off to preserve an “orderly” market. It does not pay for the raisins it appropriates, and gives many of them away, while selling others for export. Once it has covered its own costs, it returns whatever profits remain to farmers. In some years there are none. Worse, farmers sometimes forfeit a substantial share of their crop: 47% in 2003 and 30% in 2004, for example.

Participation in this Brezhnevite scheme is mandatory. […]

Read the rest at America’s raisin regime: De minimis curat lex | The Economist.