“What is this if not proof that the political class should not be allowed within a mile of regulating the press?”

As the Telegraph reports:

"When a reporter approached Mrs Miller’s office last Thursday, her special adviser, Joanna Hindley, pointed out that the Editor of The Telegraph was involved in meetings with the Prime Minister and the Culture Secretary over implementing the recommendations made by Lord Justice Leveson.

“Maria has obviously been having quite a lot of editors’ meetings around Leveson at the moment. So I am just going to kind of flag up that connection for you to think about,” said Miss Hindley.

Miss Hindley also said the reporter should discuss the issue with “people a little higher up your organisation”.

Miss Hindley immediately contacted The Telegraph’s head of public affairs to raise concerns about the story.

You don’t even have to read between the lines here. It’s bold as brass: my boss knows your boss; she’s taking some big decisions which could impact on the publication you work for; watch your step sunshine, you are just a little reporter person; call someone more senior while I get on the phone to your public affairs people.

What is this if not proof that the political class should not be allowed within a mile of regulating the press? They are at it even before they have got oversight of regulation. Mrs Miller should at the very least stand aside from the Leveson process.

Another point, about special advisers, or Spads. You may have heard a lot about this breed, and if you have seen the Thick of It you will have seen them in action. The Thick of It, however, is meant to be a comedy rather than a fly on the wall documentary.

From this cadre Britain increasingly draw the class that runs the show. Is this working out well?

…continues at Unwittingly, Maria Miller's Spad has done her country a favour – Telegraph Blogs.

via Samizdata.

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