2012: The year Irish newspapers tried to destroy the web – McGarr Solicitors – Dublin

Well, gosh darn, every citation in every white paper, every reference in every book is basically a link and therefore basically chargeable. They should start with the universities, instead…

This year the Irish newspaper industry asserted, first tentatively and then without any equivocation, that links -just bare links like this one- belonged to them. They said that they had the right to be paid to be linked to. They said they had the right to set the rates for those links, as they had set rates in the past for other forms of licensing of their intellectual property. And then they started a campaign to lobby for unauthorised linking to be outlawed.

These assertions were not merely academic positions. The Newspaper Industry (all these newspapers) had its agent write out demanding money. They wrote to Women’s Aid, (amongst others) who became our clients when they received letters, emails and phone calls asserting that they needed to buy a licence because they had linked to articles in newspapers carrying positive stories about their fundraising efforts.

These are the prices for linking they were supplied with:

  • 1 – 5 €300.00
  • 6 – 10 €500.00
  • 11 – 15 €700.00
  • 16 – 25 €950.00
  • 26 – 50 €1,350.00
  • 50 + Negotiable

They were quite clear in their demands. They told Women’s Aid “a licence is required to link directly to an online article even without uploading any of the content directly onto your own website.”

via McGarr Solicitors – Dublin Solicitors Ireland | 2012: The year Irish newspapers tried to destroy the web – McGarr Solicitors – Dublin Solicitors Ireland.

One thought on “2012: The year Irish newspapers tried to destroy the web – McGarr Solicitors – Dublin

  1. Carl

    hmm. So I trust they intended to pay everyone whose name, image, life story, misfortune etc. they ever sought to profit from?

    Reply

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